Nowadays, it seems we’re constantly surrounded by all kinds of symbols. They help us understand the world around us, conveying the meaning behind a certain idea, service, message, or even philosophy. Since the human brain is hardwired to perceive and memorize shapes, symbols are more often used for the purpose of identification, recognition, and even empowerment.

Love, passion, movement, rhythm, gratitude, connection, warmth, growth – they never go out of style. And it’s been like that since the very dawn of humanity, long before there was a unique symbol that encapsulates all those traits that make us feel more connected with ourselves, to our surroundings, and to others — the heart symbol.

It’s still not completely clear where the heart, a symbol of emotion, affection, and love, was first brought to life. Dating all the way back to 510-490 BC, a coin was found with the oldest known image of the shape we today identify as a heart. The coin was found in the ancient Roman city of Cyrene (near what is now Shahhat, Libya), which was once filled with a now-extinct species of giant fennel. It’s believed that the ‘heart-shaped’ relief on the coin is actually a representation of the seed of the silphium plant which was often used not only as a cough remedy but also as an early form of birth control. Being a common export good at the time, Libyans honored it by putting it on a coin.

Ancient silver coin from Cyrene, Libya depicting the heart-shaped 'seed' (actually fruit) of Silphium.
Ancient silver coin from Cyrene, Libya depicting the heart-shaped ‘seed’ (actually fruit) of Silphium.

 
Example of a heart-shaped mericarp fruit in a plant (Heracleum sphondylium) belonging, like the unidentified Silphium.
Example of a heart-shaped mericarp fruit in a plant (Heracleum sphondylium) belonging, like the unidentified Silphium.

Also, some researchers and historians believe that the heart shape originates from other plants such as ivy leaves (which were often associated with fidelity), or the leaves of the water-lily. Philosopher Aristotle, who portrayed the human heart as a three-chambered organ with a small dent in the middle, saw it as a center of all emotions. Stylistically reduced to a geometric shape, it also depicts an inverted triangle that serves as a vessel for pouring out and receiving love.

And it hasn’t changed much since. The only major change is how we perceive the role, significance, and meaning of symbols that surround us since they’ve infiltrated into our lives on a daily and even hourly basis.

Here at Bellabeat, we’ve always had the opinion that taking care of and being confident in yourself is the key to leading a happier life. That’s why we’re dedicated to helping women reach their overall state of wellness, based on what that means for them. We wanted to reintroduce, refresh, and revive that underlying philosophy and meaning with a new symbol; a symbol that communicates a more abstract, relatable, but suggestive language of what our mission is all about — a heart.

Using a heart as an inspiration and symbol that represents the meaning behind the Bellabeat brand was more than an intuitive way of making a full circle for Bellabeat as a company. From the earliest stages of the company’s development – where one of the earlier logo versions consisted of two intertwined leaf-shaped silhouettes in yellow and teal — to today where we’ve grown into a well-rounded brand for women’s well-being, we feel more than excited to share it with you today.

Early Version of the Bellabeat Logo
The company’s logo is just one of the ingredients in the whole branding image, and it needs to be designed so it works perfectly at a variety of sizes and in a range of applications — from an app icon to a website icon in a browser bar and even to signage on a building. Therefore, using the proverbial heart shape and reducing it to merely an outline, was a direction we were more than happy to start our new journey with. However, we wanted to take it a step further. Even though the heart’s triangular shape by default is already dynamic and vital in its nature, in order to be more associative to the Bellabeat name (letter ‘B’), tilting it sideways for a more energetic appeal seemed like an idea that is both intuitive and descriptive — so the idea came to life:

Bellabeat Early Logo
The tilted curve that visually splits the round parts of the heart in two and connects its shape into a whole, not only symbolizes the core of a cyclical nature around us, but it also contributes to the harmony of the overall form of the logo, where positive outline and negative space create visual unity. A distinctive small cut in the middle of the curve brings a sense of depth to the very form, emphasizing the connection between our everyday routine and activity with the role Bellabeat plays in it.

In terms of color, we see it as a way to portray and evoke a certain emotion and feel, hence the coral tone which blends the lightness and tenderness of pink with the vibrance and energy of orange. Bright, playful, warm, stimulative, energizing, passionate, and positive in its appeal, coral also represents movement, creativity, health, and vitality — which is by default infiltrated into every aspect of our work.

Bellabeat Logo Colors
Using the symbolism behind the form of the new logo, which is followed by the overall understanding and perception of its shape, and combining it with the coral tone makes the perfect match for the revival of the Bellabeat logo to be used in many forms and varieties, with which Users will easily identify with.

Bellabeat New Logo
Bellabeat Logo and Tagline


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